Holiday Ornament making in the Gallery

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Missouri Artist on Main 319 – 321 S. Main Street, St. Charles, MO 63301

(636) 724-1260  www.maomgallery.com

During the holiday season stop by the gallery on weekends and have fun making a holiday ornament that is yours to keep. Your $5 donation goes to Haven House of St. Louis.

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Fall a time of celebration

Porcelain serving platter by MAOM potter Clinton Berry

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Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301 (636) 724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com

The Pilgrim settlers of New England were not the first to set aside a day for expressing their gratitude to God for the harvest. The Greeks and the Romans paid tribute to their agricultural goddesses, the Anglo-Saxons celebrated Lammas and Harvest Home , and the Jewish traditions have their eight-day Sukkot, or Feast of Tabernacles. The first American Thanksgiving was entirely religious, and took place on December 4, 1619, when a group of 38 English settlers arrived at Berkeley Plantation on the James River. Their charter decreed that their day of arrival be celebrated yearly as a day of thanksgiving to God.

But most Americans think of the first “official” Thanksgiving as being the one that took place at Plymouth Colony in October 1621, a year after the Pilgrims first landed on the New England coast. They were joined in their three-day feast by Massasoit, the chief of the Wampanoag Indians, and about 90 of his fellow tribesmen.

Many states declared Thanksgiving holidays, but it wasn’t until 1863 that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday in November as a national day to give thanks. Each year thereafter, for 75 years, the president proclaimed the same day to be celebrated. In 1939, however, President Franklin D. Roosevelt moved it one week earlier to allow more time for Christmas shopping.

Finally, Congress ruled that the fourth Thursday of November would be the legal federal holiday of Thanksgiving after 1941.

Thanksgiving. (2015). In H. Henderson (Ed.), Holidays, Festivals & Celebrations of the world dictionary: Detailing more than 3,300 observances from all 50 states and more than 100 nations. Detroit, MI: Omnigraphics, Inc..

Fall is a time of feasting, of celebrating and giving thanks with family and friends.  MAOM is the perfect place to find a one of a kind serving piece to grace your holiday table.

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Selection of work by MAOM potter Angel Brame.

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Perhaps a large serving platter by Clinton Berry.

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A wonderful jar by MAOM potter John Preus.

Missouri Artist on Main offers a wonderful selection of functional ware . The gallery is open seven days a week and in preparation for the upcoming holidays we will have extended hours starting after Thanksgiving.

Perspective

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Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301

(636) 724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com

Drawing by MAOM artist Adam Long

The word ‘perspective’ derives from the Latin (ars) perspectiva. The method of giving a sense of depth on a flat or shallow surface, utilizing such optical phenomena as the apparent convergence of parallel lines and diminution in size of objects as they recede from the spectator. Systematic, mathematically founded perspective, based initially on a fixed central viewpoint, was developed in Italy in the early 15th century.

Chilvers, Ian. “perspective.” The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists. : Oxford University Press, 2009. Oxford Reference. 2009. Date Accessed 30 Sep. 2016

Perspective is the art of depicting solid objects on a two-dimensional or shallow surface so as to give the right impression of their height, width, depth, and position in relation to each other. Only certain cultures have embraced perspective, for example the art of the ancient Egyptians took no account of the effects of spatial recession. Mathematically-based perspective, ordered round a central vanishing point, was developed in early Renaissance Italy. It was invented by Filippo Brunelleschi (1377–1446), described by Leon Battista Alberti (1404–72) in his treatise De Pictura, and is often referred to as linear perspective.

Perspective  may be conveyed in at least four ways: aerial perspective, perspective of receding planes, perspective of scale, and linear or ‘vanishing point’ perspective.

  • Aerial perspective is conveyed by loss of contrast and detail in more distant subjects.
  • The perspective of receding planes is most clearly seen in Japanese and Chinese brush paintings of mountains: even with no other indicator of scale, if one thing is in front of another it creates an impression of depth.
  • Perspective of scale or size is clear when, for example, there are two human figures in a picture, one of which is twice the size of the other. Experience argues that in reality both are of similar height, so one must be further away.
  • Vanishing point is that spot on the horizon line which receding parallel lines diminish. As things get further away from us they seem smaller and closer together. When they get far enough away, distances become small and form a single single point.

Image result for vanishing point perspective

Visit the gallery is historic St. Charles to see the work of our talented Missouri artists.

Silk (UPDATE)

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Missouri Artists On Main 315-321 South Main Saint Charles MO 63301  http://www.maomgallery.com  (636) 724-1260

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The Silk class was a HUGE success, HUGE! Participants worked with Jean McMullen and Deb Mansir to create beautiful scarves.

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Contact the gallery and ask to be placed on the contact list to be notified as classes are scheduled. You can also check the webpage ( http://www.maomgallery.com ) to see the list of upcoming classes.

Silk

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Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301

(636) 724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com

Natural fiber produced by many creatures, notably the silkworm. The many kinds of silk include crépe, satin, taffeta, and velvet. Almost all silk comes from silkworms reared commercially; a single cocoon can provide between 600 and 900m (2,000–3,000ft) of filament.  The cocoons are soaked to unstick the fibers, and the strands are unwound together to form a single thread of yarn. The Chinese were the first to use silk. Silk manufacturing developed in England in the 17th century. China is the largest producer of raw silk. (“silk.” World Encyclopedia. : Philip’s. Oxford Reference. 2004. Date Accessed 23 Aug. 2016.)

Hand Dyed Silk

There are an infinite number of ways one can bind, stitch, fold, twist, or compress silk  and each way results in very different patterns. Each method is used to achieve a certain result, Also, different techniques can be used in conjunction with one another to achieve even more elaborate results.

Have you always wanted to learn some of the many techniques used to dye silk? 

silk scarf making

Well, here is your chance!

Silk Scarf Making in the Microwave

September 1 at 2- 4 or 6 – 8 p.m.$35 includes supplies

 join resident artists Deb Mansir & Jean McMullen

Learn how to make beautiful silk scarves using a microwave that look like a flower garden!  Students will leave wearing 2 beautiful scarves.  More can be made and purchased during this 2 hour class!

 

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Call the gallery to register for this exciting and fun class. (636) 724-1260

Festival of the Little Hills

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Missouri Artist on Main 319 – 321 S. Main Street, St. Charles, MO 63301

(636) 724-1260  www.maomgallery.com

Again this year Missouri Artist on Main will be participating in the Festival of the Little Hills. MAOM artists will be bringing in extra work to stock the booth on the street and the gallery will stay open late Friday and Saturday evening.

Festival

The largest festival of the year in St. Charles, activities include over 300 craft booths, with demonstrations by crafts people and artisans. Also includes numerous food & beverages booths along with live music and other entertainment and the Kids Corner.

2016 Festival Dates: August 19 – August 21

Friday, August 19 — 4:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Saturday, August 20 — 9:30 AM – 10:00 PM
Sunday, August 21 — 9:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Parking? Don’t worry, there is shuttle service.

FREE SHUTTLE to the FESTIVAL

Locations:

Duchesne High School
2550 Elm Street
St. Charles, MO 63301

St. Charles West High School
3601 Droste Road
St. Charles, MO 63301

EPC – Executive Personal Computers
3941 Harry S. Truman Blvd.
St. Charles, MO 63301
(at Interstate 70 and Cave Springs)
Handicapped Shuttle available

St. Charles Family Arena
2002 Arena Pkwy.
St. Charles, MO 63303

Come early and stay late. Enjoy the music and food!

The booth on the street and the gallery, upstairs and down, will be stocked with beautiful work by over 40 Missouri artists.

Silk scarves!

Joyce Rothermich scarf

Jewelry!

Cloisonne Earrings

Glass!

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Ceramics!

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and more!

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See you at the Festival of the Little Hills!

 

 

Art of Collage

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Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301

(636) 724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com

Collage [Fr. coller: ‘to stick, glue’].

Art form and technique, incorporating the use of pre-existing materials or objects attached as part of a two-dimensional surface.

Frascina, Francis, et al. “Collage.” Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Ed. Michael Kelly. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press.  7 Jul. 2016.

Within the visual arts, collage is usually associated with Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism. Collage has also been a central element in many practices since World War II, ranging from Pop artists in the United States; from activist art in the 1960’s (such as The Collage of Indignation, 1967) to feminist work produced since the late 1960’s. Clearly, from these examples, the term collage relates directly to what is called photomontage and montage. Both of the latter have been major elements in representations of modernity: photomontage in, for example, highly politicized posters and journals, most notably during the 1930’s and, again, in anti–Vietnam War imagery; montage in the development of film, as in Fernand Léger’s Ballet Mécanique (1924). Recently, collage and montage have described processes and effects within television, video, and varieties of products resulting from digital image manipulation: selecting, cutting, editing, piecing together, and thereby producing a particular combination.

In the spring of 1912, Pablo Picasso glued a piece of oil-cloth printed with imitation chair-caning to a painting of a cafe still life, thereby inaugurating the aesthetically revolutionary practice of collage. The Still Life with Chair Caning, which the artist also framed with a coarse mariner’s rope, is a small, oval, seemingly modest work, yet its effects on twentieth-century art have been profound. Picasso’s Still Life with Chair Caning is thought to be the first work in which the humble medium of collage announced itself as equal to painting. The intrusion of everyday, non artistic materials into the domain of high art challenged some of the most fundamental assumptions about painting inherited from both the classical and the more recent avant garde traditions. The invention of collage put into question prevailing notions of what and how works of art signify, what materials artists may use, and what constitutes unity in a work of art.

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MAOM artist Jan Adams incorporates collage into her works which she calls ‘Memory Paintings.’ She inventively incorporates landmarks from cities and neighborhoods and personalizes them with notes and sign boards.

Jean McMullen the owner of MAOM and a well know watercolor artist combines collage elements with panting and calligraphy in her work. Her series of work centered around wine incorporates labels from the bottles and in some cases corks and wine glasses.

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Both Jan and Jean will work with individuals to personalize a collage to celebrate a special event or a wonderful memory. Please come by the gallery to see their work along with that of all forty plus Missouri artists.