Valentine’s Day

 

 

MAOMlogoMissouri Artists On Main

315-321 South Main Street, St. Charles, MO

636-724-1260 http://www.maomgallery.com/ 

Necklace by MAOM jeweler Donna Knox

St. Valentine is believed to have been a Roman priest who was martyred on February 14 around 270. How he became the patron saint of lovers remains a mystery, but one theory is that the Church used the day of St. Valentine’s martyrdom in an attempt to Christianize the old Roman Lupercallia, a pagan festival held around the middle of February.

In the late 1300s, we begin to find the first clear references to a tradition relating February 14, St. Valentine’s Day, to romantic love. Poems were composed for the event, the earliest being Chaucer’s Parliament of Fowls(c.1381), about rival bird-suitors quarreling on Valentine‘s Day. The first Valentine’s Day cards were handmade, but by the early nineteenth century, printed cards were common in England. When this fashion was exported to the United States in the 1840s, a veritable Valentine mania broke out.

Bowler, Gerry. “Valentine’s Day.” St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. Ed. Thomas Riggs. 2nd ed. Vol. 5. Detroit: St. James Press, 2013. 222. Gale Virtual Reference Library.

Missouri Artist On Main offers a wonderful selection of gifts to celebrate the day.

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Chain mail necklace by MAOM jewler Melanie Hancock

Joyce Rothermich scarf

Hand painted and dyed silk scarves by various MAOM artists.

Cloisonne Earrings

Earrings by MAOM jewler Kathryn Leventhal-Arnold

VicBarr Boxes by MAOM wood artist Vic Barr

drew_weaving Wearable art by MAOM master weaver / fiber artists Judith Drew

Perhaps the perfect gift would be a workshop or multi-week class at the gallery. Please visit http://www.maomgallery.com/art-classes-.html for a list of all upcoming classes.

 

 

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HAPPY HOLIDAYS! It is that time of year!

MAOMlogo

Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301

(636) 724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com

The gallery is full of great items to fill every holiday shopping list.

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Watercolors by MAOM artist Janine Helton

meet the artist

MAOM represents over 40 Missouri artists. And, we take turns staffing the building so come meet the artist. As you can see some are real characters.

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Can’t decide? We offer gift certificates.

Don’t forget…

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MAOM occupies the entire building. Much more work upstairs.

Think about it…

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take a class. MAOM offers classes in many different media. Bring a friend, great gift idea. Check out the webpage http://www.maomgallery.com to find a complete listing of the upcoming offerings.

 

 

MOSAICS Fine Art Festival

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Missouri Artist On Main

315 – 321 South Main St., St. Charles MO 63301

636-724-1260        http://www.maomgallery.com/

Please join MAOM in celebrating the 23rd Mosaics Fine Arts Festival this weekend.

Friday, September 15th: 4 – 9 PM

Saturday, September 16th: 11 AM – 9 PM

Sunday, September 17th: 11 AM – 5 PM

Drop by the MAOM booths and stop in the gallery to view even more work from over 40 Missouri artists.

The MAOM gallery will be staying open late on Friday and Saturday nights.

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Functional pottery by MAOM artist Clinton Berry

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Beautiful work by MAOM print maker Vary Mosblech

kathy-hat2  Beautiful wearable art by MAOM felter Kathy Shallow

Jean McMullen_casa-da-loco-winery Wine themed art by MAOM director Jean McMullen

…and many more wonderful Missouri artist.

 

 

 

Festival Of The Little Hills 2017

Missouri Artists On Main

315 – 321 South Main St. St. Charles, MO

636-724-1260 http://www.maomgallery.com

 

The gallery will be open for extended hour during the Festival of the Little Hills. Please stop in and view the work of over 40 Missouri artists.

This Year’s Festival Dates:

Friday, August 18, 2017 — 4:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Saturday, August 19, 2017 — 9:30 AM – 10:00 PM
Sunday, August 20, 2017 — 9:30 AM – 5:00 PM

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Jewelry by MAOM artist Melanie Hancock

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Pottery by MAOM artist Clinton Berry 

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Prints by Mary Mosblech

Jean McMullen_casa-da-loco-winery Wine collages by Jean McMullen

Janine Helton_here comes trouble

Watercolors by Janine Helton

And so many more!

Don’t forget to check out the upcoming class schedule, online at http://www.maomgallery.com

 

Weaving

MAOMlogo

Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301

(636) 724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com

From prehistory to the present day many civilizations and cultures have contributed to the development of weaving.

Woven cloth has been, and continues to be, produced on a variety of loom types that reflect an array of historical, cultural, and regional circumstances. Today they range from basic, portable backstrap looms to widely used electronic jacquard looms.

It is likely that the development of weaving was instigated by the basic needs of prehistoric people: food, shelter, and clothing. The embellishment of woven objects is similarly historical; natural dyes on reeds and weaving elements in different sizes and colors were combined to create patterns, indicating a desire to convey individuality and aesthetic awareness.

The treadle loom, developed in China during the Shang period (1766-1122 BC) is the precursor of modern hand and industrial looms. The treadle loom consists of long pedals, which are operated by the weaver’s feet and are tied to one or more shafts making it easier to raise and lower warp threads in selected combinations. Importantly, it allowed weavers to keep their hands free to manipulate the shuttle.

The most significant developments in weave production started in the eighteenth century when the Industrial Revolution pioneered a shift toward mechanical production. The first practical power loom was designed by Edmund Cartwright in 1787, but it was the 1820s before technical shortcomings were resolved and the weaving industry was transformed.

In France, in 1801, Joseph Jacquard invented a loom that represented a major technological breakthrough. A series of punched cards was added to the top of the loom to control a complex pattern of warp threads. This complicated machine later developed into a looped arrangement of cards for creating repeat patterns in cloth and carpets. The jacquard loom enabled intricate patterns to be woven without the continual intervention of the weaver and is widely acknowledged to be a precursor of modern computer science.

Anni Albers, former Bauhaus and Black Mountain College weaving  tutor, took the craft of hand weaving to new levels of creativity during her prolific career spanning the twentieth century. Significantly, this involved breaking down the traditional perceptions of weaving, to the extent that her designs were widely seen as art forms full of similar creative content and vitality to that found in fine art and in particular abstract paintings. Albers defined weaving as forming a pliable plane of threads by rectangular interlacing. She described the woven cloth as possessing two key elements: the building material (by which she meant the thread structure and the character of the fibers it contained) and the actual weave or construction. Albers developed her definition by explaining weaving as the process of passing the weft between taut, alternatively raised warps, creating a plain weave, or between other combinations of selected warps.

“Hand-woven textile designs.” Textile Design, Simon Clarke, Laurence King, 1st edition, 2011. Credo Reference Accessed 19 Jul 2017.

 

 A rectangular or square frame can be the simplest of looms.

MAOM will offer a class for beginning weavers during the month of August.

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Painting With Yarn, Tapestry For Beginners

resident artist, Judith Drew

In this class, each student is provided a lap-sized frame loom which you will prepare to be two sided.  One side for exercises and techniqes, and the other
for your original woven design.  All cord and yarns provided, plus small tools.

Sundays, August 6, 13, 20 (3 weeks)
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
$70 (Adult) and $60 (Children) with an adult  (9 years old and up)

All Materials Provided!

636-724-1260  

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