Watercolor Exhibition

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MISSOURI ARTIST ON MAIN
315-321 South Main Street
St. Charles, MO 63301
(636) 721-1260
http://www.maomgallery.com

Watercolor takes center stage during the month of April in the gallery.

Missouri Artist On Main will once again host the St. Louis Watercolor Society’s annual juried exhibition, April 7th through the 28th 2017. Opening reception is April 7th 6:30 – 9:00 p.m. awards ceremony 7:30 p.m.

The exhibition is juried by international watercolor artist and author Alvaro Castagnet. Born in Montevideo Uruguay, schooled at the National School of Art and the Fine Arts University, Alvaro Castagnet travels the world painting, teaching and exhibiting his work.

Alvaro’s award winning work graces the walls of many private and corporate collectors worldwide.

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He will teach a two day workshop April 8th and 9th in St. Louis sponsored by the St. Louis Watercolor Society.

His latest book; Watercolor Masterclass: Understanding the four pillars of watercolor was published in 2015 by Artbook24.

Millinery / Milliners

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MISSOURI ARTIST ON MAIN

315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301  (636) 724-1260 http://www.maomgallery.com

Hat by MAOM artist Diane Tessman

Milliners create hats for women; hat makers make hats for men.

The term “millinery” is derived from “Millaners,” merchants from the Italian city of Milan, who traveled to northern Europe trading in silks, ribbons, braids, ornaments, and general finery. First chronicled in the early sixteenth century, these traveling haberdashers were received by noble aristocratic households, passing on news of the latest fashions as well as selling their wear. News of the latest styles and variations on dress was as important to men as it was to women, and milliners often acted as much sought-after fashion advisers to nobility all over Europe. One such milliner is mentioned by William Shakespeare in Henry IV part 1, when the gallant warrior Hotspur refers to his encounter with a “trimly dress’d lord” as: Fresh as a bridegroom; and his chin reap’d show’d like a stubble – land at harvest-home; He was perfumed like a milliner; And ‘twixt his finger and his thumb he held a pouncet box.  (Hopkins, Susie. “Milliners.” Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion, edited by Valerie Steele, vol. 2 Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2005, pp. 411 -415.)

Missouri Artist on Main exhibits the work of two local milliners; Diane Tessman and Kathy Shallow. Each works in a completely different method creating unique, beautiful and fun creations.

Kathy Shallow creates needle felted hats, scarves and accessories from Alpaca wool raised on her two sister’s farms. Kathy says; “Alpaca is such a wonderful fiber to work with, very soft, warm and lightweight.”

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Her hats, scarves, purses and bags are wonderfully dyed in a range of rich colors,

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and the felted Alpaca wool feels wonderful.

Diane Tessman carries on a multi generational family tradition that she learned from her grandparents and mother; and that she and her sister continue.  Diane said,”Believing heavily in repurposing, we recycle cashmere and lambswool sweaters, blue jeans and pretty much anything that can be redone. Everything is handmade, no forms or ready-made additions. The hats are braided, just as a rug would be braided, and sewn on a commercial machine using a technique of tension in holding the braid. The hat is completely formed when it leaves the machine. Each hat is uniquely different.” (Deer, Karen. “Made in St. Louis: Two sisters keep a family tradition growing by making hats.” St. Louis Post Dispatch, Dec. 27, 2013.)

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Please visit the gallery to see the work of our milliners.

BTW… once inspired by Diane and Kathy’s work visit an Edgar Degas exhibit featuring hats and paintings, “Degas, Impressionism and the Paris Millinery Trade” is on view at the St. Louis Art Museum through May 7. It is a fantastic exhibit and a chance to view not only major works of impressionism but also a wonderful collections of 40 period hats.

 


	

Take Heart! Happy Valentine’s Day

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MISSOURI ARTIST ON MAIN

315-321 South Main Street St. Charles, MO

636-724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com/

Happy Valentine’s Day from Missouri Artists On Main. We want to remind you, we have beautiful gifts for your special someone! Need ideas? We can help. Pick from beautiful hand dyed scarves,

Joyce Rothermich scarf

hand painted silk scarf by MAOM artist Joyce Rothermich

handmade hats or woven shawls,

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hat by MAOM fiber artist Diane Tessman

kathy-shallow

felted hat by MAOM fiber artist Kathy Shallow

glass,

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tray by MAOM glass artist Kitty Mollman

 

jewelry boxes plus custom jewelry for her.

Cloisonne Earrings

earrings by MAOM jeweler Kathryn Leventhal-Arnold

One-of-a-kind handmade wooden boxes,

VicBarr

box by MAOM wood artist Vic Barr

chainmaille jewelry

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necklace by MAOM jeweler Melanie Hancock

and stunning photographs for him!

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photo by MAOM photographer Clark Willett

We also have gift certificates for gifts and classes. We look forward to seeing you. Treat Yourself while your there!

Beat the winter blues!

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Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main, St. Charles, MO  63301

(636) 724-1260   http://www.maomgallery.com

Art Classes in the Gallery

What better way to spend a January afternoon, evening, couple of hours or an entire weekend than stirring your creative juices. We have a great lineup of onetime workshops and multi-week classes taught by the artist who exhibit in MAOM. St. Charles is a great spot to explore your creative side and the gallery is easily accessible from interstate 70.

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Watercolor taught by resident artist Joyce Rothermich is an eight week class meeting on Friday afternoons 1:30 – 4 p.m. Starting January 20th – March 17th (no class or March 10th).

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Snow Fun taught by resident artist Janine Helton a one day workshop meeting Wednesday, January 25, 2017 from 12 noon – 5 p.m.

adamlong_drawing

Intro to Drawing taught by resident artist Adam Long a four week class with two options Tuesday afternoons 1 – 3 p.m. or evenings 6 – 8 p.m starting January 31st.

Kumihimo

Kumihimo Beaded Bracelet taught by resident artist Rosanne Sartori is back by popular demand. Sunday, January 15th from 1 – 4 p.m.

Check out the webpage ( http://www.maomgallery.com/home.html )for a complete list of upcoming classes.

HOLIDAY SHOPPING

Watercolor collage by award winning MAOM artist and gallery owner Jean McMullen.

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Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301

(636) 724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com

The gallery is full of great items to fill every holiday shopping list. Can’t decide? We offer gift certificates.

silk scarf making silk_class_4

Beautiful hand dyed and hand painted silk scarves.

Over 42 Missouri artist display their work in the historic two story building.

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If you stop by after dark be sure to take your picture on the lawn with the beautiful lighted display by MAOM artist Adam Long.

Ardor

Wall sculpture by MAOM artist Adam Long

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Exciting work my MAOM scratch board artist Brad Leber

kathy-shallow

Today’s cold weather is perfect for one of Kathy Shallow’s warm felted hats.

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Diane Tessman creates wonderful, beautiful hats by weaving fabric and forming them.

We offer gift wrapping while you wait. Perhaps there will be hot cider and cookies to enjoy.

Visit the Facebook page of Missouri Artist on Main to see even more examples of the great work crafted by hand from the heart of the wonderful group of artist who call MAOM home.

Fall a time of celebration

Porcelain serving platter by MAOM potter Clinton Berry

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Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301 (636) 724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com

The Pilgrim settlers of New England were not the first to set aside a day for expressing their gratitude to God for the harvest. The Greeks and the Romans paid tribute to their agricultural goddesses, the Anglo-Saxons celebrated Lammas and Harvest Home , and the Jewish traditions have their eight-day Sukkot, or Feast of Tabernacles. The first American Thanksgiving was entirely religious, and took place on December 4, 1619, when a group of 38 English settlers arrived at Berkeley Plantation on the James River. Their charter decreed that their day of arrival be celebrated yearly as a day of thanksgiving to God.

But most Americans think of the first “official” Thanksgiving as being the one that took place at Plymouth Colony in October 1621, a year after the Pilgrims first landed on the New England coast. They were joined in their three-day feast by Massasoit, the chief of the Wampanoag Indians, and about 90 of his fellow tribesmen.

Many states declared Thanksgiving holidays, but it wasn’t until 1863 that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday in November as a national day to give thanks. Each year thereafter, for 75 years, the president proclaimed the same day to be celebrated. In 1939, however, President Franklin D. Roosevelt moved it one week earlier to allow more time for Christmas shopping.

Finally, Congress ruled that the fourth Thursday of November would be the legal federal holiday of Thanksgiving after 1941.

Thanksgiving. (2015). In H. Henderson (Ed.), Holidays, Festivals & Celebrations of the world dictionary: Detailing more than 3,300 observances from all 50 states and more than 100 nations. Detroit, MI: Omnigraphics, Inc..

Fall is a time of feasting, of celebrating and giving thanks with family and friends.  MAOM is the perfect place to find a one of a kind serving piece to grace your holiday table.

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Selection of work by MAOM potter Angel Brame.

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Perhaps a large serving platter by Clinton Berry.

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A wonderful jar by MAOM potter John Preus.

Missouri Artist on Main offers a wonderful selection of functional ware . The gallery is open seven days a week and in preparation for the upcoming holidays we will have extended hours starting after Thanksgiving.

Perspective

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Missouri Artists On Main, 315 – 321 S. Main St. Charles, MO  63301

(636) 724-1260  http://www.maomgallery.com

Drawing by MAOM artist Adam Long

The word ‘perspective’ derives from the Latin (ars) perspectiva. The method of giving a sense of depth on a flat or shallow surface, utilizing such optical phenomena as the apparent convergence of parallel lines and diminution in size of objects as they recede from the spectator. Systematic, mathematically founded perspective, based initially on a fixed central viewpoint, was developed in Italy in the early 15th century.

Chilvers, Ian. “perspective.” The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists. : Oxford University Press, 2009. Oxford Reference. 2009. Date Accessed 30 Sep. 2016

Perspective is the art of depicting solid objects on a two-dimensional or shallow surface so as to give the right impression of their height, width, depth, and position in relation to each other. Only certain cultures have embraced perspective, for example the art of the ancient Egyptians took no account of the effects of spatial recession. Mathematically-based perspective, ordered round a central vanishing point, was developed in early Renaissance Italy. It was invented by Filippo Brunelleschi (1377–1446), described by Leon Battista Alberti (1404–72) in his treatise De Pictura, and is often referred to as linear perspective.

Perspective  may be conveyed in at least four ways: aerial perspective, perspective of receding planes, perspective of scale, and linear or ‘vanishing point’ perspective.

  • Aerial perspective is conveyed by loss of contrast and detail in more distant subjects.
  • The perspective of receding planes is most clearly seen in Japanese and Chinese brush paintings of mountains: even with no other indicator of scale, if one thing is in front of another it creates an impression of depth.
  • Perspective of scale or size is clear when, for example, there are two human figures in a picture, one of which is twice the size of the other. Experience argues that in reality both are of similar height, so one must be further away.
  • Vanishing point is that spot on the horizon line which receding parallel lines diminish. As things get further away from us they seem smaller and closer together. When they get far enough away, distances become small and form a single single point.

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Visit the gallery is historic St. Charles to see the work of our talented Missouri artists.